ISSN 1016-5169 | E-ISSN 1308-4488
Archives of the Turkish Society of Cardiology
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Electrophysiological correlates of cardiac sarcoidosis: an appraisal of current evidence [Turk Kardiyol Dern Ars]
Turk Kardiyol Dern Ars. 2015; 43(4): 392-401 | DOI: 10.5543/tkda.2015.53333

Electrophysiological correlates of cardiac sarcoidosis: an appraisal of current evidence

Mrinal Yadava, Rupa Bala
Knight Cardiovascular Institute, Oregon Health And Science University, Portland, Oregon, United States Of America

Cardiac sarcoidosis is an underdiagnosed condition that may be present in as many as 25% of patients with systemic sarcoidosis. It is associated with significant morbidity and mortality in affected individuals. The presentation of cardiac involvement in sarcoidosis includes sudden death in the absence of preceding symptoms, conduction disturbances, ventricular arrhythmias, and heart failure. A scarcity of randomized data and a lack of prospective trials underlies the contention between experts on the most appropriate strategies for diagnosis and therapy. This review focuses on the electrophysiological sequelae of the disease, with an emphasis on current diagnostic guidelines, multimodality imaging for early detection, and the role of various therapeutic interventions. Multicentre collaboration is necessary to address the numerous unanswered questions pertaining to management of this disease.

Keywords: Cardiac sarcoidosis, implantable cardioverter-defibrillator; sudden death; ventricular tachycardia.

How to cite this article
Mrinal Yadava, Rupa Bala. Electrophysiological correlates of cardiac sarcoidosis: an appraisal of current evidence. Turk Kardiyol Dern Ars. 2015; 43(4): 392-401

Corresponding Author: Mrinal Yadava, United States
Manuscript Language: English


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